What MLK and the Civil Rights Movement Mean to HIV in the South

What MLK and the Civil Rights Movement Mean to HIV in the South

By Stephen Lucin When Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. stepped out onto the balcony of room 306 of the Lorraine Motel in Memphis, TN, on April 4, 1968, he was unaware that a gunman would open fire on him, rendering an end to his peaceful civil disobedience Civil Rights movement that carried its way throughout the Southern United States. Because of his actions, and in the many years following his assassination, so much change occurred in terms of race relations and equality. However, nearly a half century later, a new issue would arise to disproportionately affect the Southern U.S. and the African-American community: HIV and AIDS. Today, the states that compose the Southern portion of the U.S. continue to maintain top
By: Robert Cigan

What MLK and the Civil Rights Movement Mean to HIV in the South

By: Robert Cigan
September 30th
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September 30th
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What MLK and the Civil Rights Movement Mean to HIV in the South