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Chicago’s Risqué “PrEP4Love” Ad Campaign

The Chicago PrEP Working Group launched “PrEP4Love” last month, a citywide, sex-positive media campaign to get people talking (and hopefully obtaining, if appropriate) PrEP, the HIV prevention pill.

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    Chicago Sexes it up to Stop HIV

    The Chicago PrEP Working Group launched “PrEP4Love” last month, a citywide, sex-positive media campaign to get people talking (and hopefully obtaining, if appropriate) PrEP, the HIV prevention pill.

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    Why all the sex-positive stuff?

    It's important to understand why sex-positive campaigns are effective and necessary. Shaming people for having sex is scientifically proven ineffective (even contradictory) in preventing HIV. By instead celebrating sex, people feel more affirmed to talk to their doctor openly about obtaining PrEP and having safe sex. People at risk for HIV are already stigmatized for being gay, bisexual or transgender in many cases.

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    Messaging where it’s needed

    PrEP4Love is going up where at-risk groups will see the messages, such as aboard Chicago CTA trains and buses, as well as in an interactive, heated bus shelter at State and Lake Streets. “Honest and visceral photography with a simple tagline – ‘One pill. Once a day. Protect against HIV.’ – is displayed in ads,” according to a PrEP4Love news release.

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    Feel free to get hot

    “The campaign message is simple: With PrEP, you can catch desire, contract heat, spread tingle, transmit love and enjoy your sexuality while protecting yourself against HIV,” said John Peller, AIDS Foundation of Chicago president and CEO. “With just one pill, taken once a day, PrEP lowers your chances of contracting HIV up to 99 percent. That level of protection offers extraordinary peace of mind, which is incredibly sexy.”

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    Real people, real love

    The campaign uses real people – not necessarily those with idyllic bodies or Hollywood’s version of what's “hot.”

    “When people see the campaign, they are going to see real people who are relatable, people they may know personally,” said Beverly Ross, a Chicago-based transgender advocate who is featured in the campaign.